Are quick marriages at risk for divorce?

Spouses entering into a marriage in Florida surely want the union to last. Perhaps spending more time dating could lead to a happier marriage. Not everyone dates for months or years before the wedding. Some couples rush into things and do so without regrets. A marriage following a shorter dating period could work out well. Unfortunately, some studies show “quick” marriages don’t always work out well.

Rushing into marriage may create problems

A study performed by Economic Inquiry revealed that couples who dated for two or three years before getting married found themselves less like to divorce than those involved in “whirlwind” romances. Those involved in a three-year romantic period before marriage had better chances than those who spent two years unwed.

That said, couples that marry after a two or three-year courtship could find themselves divorced. People who marry six months after meeting one another may eventually celebrate a 50-year anniversary. All married couples are different, and their lives together are unique. Sweeping generalities about whether a marriage may or may not last might be unfounded.

Still, there are reasons why people who date longer before marriage could experience better odds of things working out. The extended time always the couple to see if they are a right match for one another. Problems that occur before marriage might be much easier to address than after. A break-up between paramours takes little effort, and a messy divorce could prove overwhelming.

Things to consider about marriage and divorce

Maybe a prenuptial agreement seems advisable. No matter how long a couple waits before getting married, signing a pre-marriage contract could protect both spouse’s interests. Persons engaged in a “quick marriage” might find these agreements beneficial.

No matter how long a couple dated or how long they were married, some unions are untenable. Abuse, financial mismanagement, and infidelity could ruin things. If a marriage starts to fall apart and reconciliation seems impossible, consulting with a divorce attorney might be necessary.

A family law attorney could guide advise a client about Florida’s divorce statutes. Florida follows “equitable distribution” rules, which factors into how assets end up divided.